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16 April 2018
By portermathewsblog


Hayden Groves via therealestateconversation.com.au

The REIWA has come out in support of the WA state government’s plans to improve housing affordability by increasing housing diversity and density.

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The Real Estate Institute of Western Australia supports a State Government plan to improve housing diversity and density to boost housing affordability.

REIWA President Hayden Groves said housing affordability remains one of the more challenging issues affecting West Australians.

“REIWA believes that access to secure and appropriate housing is essential to the success of communities and the prosperity of our state.

“REIWA is committed to ensuring everyone wins in property and will work alongside the WA Government to ensure the Affordable Housing Action Plan makes a positive impact to the lives of West Australians,” Mr Groves said.

Minister for Housing; Veterans Issues; Youth, Peter Tinley outlined the strategic plan this week, which promotes a ‘connected city’ by ensuring the needs of our diverse population are met.

“REIWA would like to congratulate Minister Tinley and the WA Government on this initiative that will promote a connected, sustainable and accessible property market into the future,” Mr Groves said.

The McGowan Government aims to deliver affordable homes as part of its METRONET vision and is currently developing its Affordable Housing Action Plan for release in mid-2018.

REIWA will work alongside the Government during the development of the action plan which focuses on:

  • Connection between people, place and home;
  • Real and enduring affordability for those on low-to-moderate incomes;
  • Earlier and more connected housing and support services;
  • Creation of diverse precincts that will include options for low-income earners; and,
  • Diversity of options to meet diversity of need.

REIWA sits on the METRONET industry board and will work closely to advocate the delivery of affordable housing stock and the creation of METROHUBS.

REIWA will continue to actively support Government in ensuring all Western Australian’s have access to affordable housing through collaboration with the private sector.

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13 April 2018
By portermathewsblog


via popsugar.com.au

The Best Home Decor For Small Spaces

There’s an art to living thoughtfully in cramped quarters, but there’s a science to choosing pieces that will make the most of your square footage. These decorative essentials seem to pop up in the most stylish small spaces again and again. So tell us, are these space-saving pieces in your home?

Source: A Beautiful Mess

Nesting Tables

Nesting TablesImage Source: Decor Fix

Three tables for the space of one? That’s the beauty of nesting tables. Fan them out when you need more surface area, move them around if you have guests, then tuck them in when you’re done.

Bonus tip: choose an acrylic option, like the set Decor Fix blogger Heather Freeman has to take up less visual space!


Poufs

Poufs
Image Source: House*Tweaking

If you’re a pouf pessimist, you’re underestimating their versatility. Set snacks out on your coffee table, and watch your friends flock to the poufs for prime seating. Position one in front of a chair, and you have an instant lounger. Place one next to your sofa, set a tray on top, and admire your new side table. Best of all, they can be stacked or stored under your coffee table when you aren’t using them.

Floating Shelves

Floating Shelves
Image Source: Little Green Notebook

Floating shelves are ideal for adding more storage than your floor plan allows for. This cramped bedroom didn’t have room for a nightstand, but Jenny Komenda from Little Green Notebook created a smart floating-shelf alternative.

 

Large Mirrors

Large MirrorsImage Source: Love Grows Wild

If you can’t knock down walls, add mirrors. They have the power to reflect light and visually expand a room, so it looks much larger than it actually is.

Pro tip: try styling a large mirror (like the one in Jillian Harris’s home) by layering it behind another piece of furniture.

Hanging Storage

Hanging Storage
Image Source: SF Girl by Bay

You may not have a walk-in closet, but even an unused nook or corner can serve as an impromptu closet if you hang a DIY copper-pipe rack.

 

Baskets

BasketsImage Source: A Beautiful Mess

Whether you choose larger lidded options to slide under a console table or line shelves with smaller versions, baskets are essential for organising clutter.

 

Rolling Carts

Rolling CartsImage Source: A Beautiful Mess

There are a myriad of ways to utilise a rolling cart. It can be used as everything from a bar cart (or better yet, coffee station!) to a nightstand. Wheels make it easier to move to different spots . . . like the living room, if you’re entertaining.

 

Pretty Boxes

Pretty Boxes
Source: Manuel Rodriguez for One Kings Lane

The key to making any bookshelf look immaculately streamlined is to load it with beautiful boxes. It’s the perfect way to hoard anything from receipts to your washi tape collection without having your belongings look like a mess.

Under-the-Bed Storage

Under-the-Bed StorageImage Source: Tony Vu for One Kings Lane

A bed skirt and a plastic pull-out container is your ticket for storing seasonal clothes without anyone having to know. You have the space, so why not use it?

Hanging Coatracks

Hanging CoatracksImage Source: iStock

Sure, you could hang coats or hats from these racks, but there’s no need to stop there. Display a set of cabinet-hogging mugs in your kitchen, or organise necklaces in your bedroom. The possibilities are endless.

 

Stackable Storage

Stackable StorageImage Source: West Elm

If you’re short on counter space, think vertically. This stackable apothecary set is ideal for keeping bath and beauty supplies within reach.

 

Slim Hangers

Slim HangersSource: Justin Coit for Domaine Home

Former-reality-star-turned-fashion-designer Whitney Port uses these slim hangers to pack in as many clothes as possible in her cute closet space.

 

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09 April 2018
By portermathewsblog


Author: REIWA President Hayden Groves via reiwa.com.au

Although rent prices across the state have been on a downward trajectory for the last couple of years, the rate of decline has slowed with the median rent price holding steady at $350 per week since April last year.

The number of rental properties on the market has also improved, declining to approximately 8,500 listings metro wide, well down from the peak of 11,300 in 2016.

While Perth landlords don’t enjoy the dominance they experienced a few years ago, property investment is still a smart decision. And thankfully, interest rates on borrowings continue to sit at historically low levels, mitigating some of the short term financial discomfort resulting from lower rent prices.

Get your asking price right from the start

When pricing your property and preparing it for lease, it’s crucial you heed the advice of your REIWA property manager. Tenants are out there in good numbers, in fact, leasing activity reached an all-time high last year and remains at above-average levels in 2018.

Provided your rental property is marketed competitively, you have a very good chance of securing a tenant. However, if you choose to price your property higher than your agent’s recommendations, tenants are very likely to bypass your listing.

The first two weeks of listing your property for rent are the most crucial. Get your initial asking price wrong and you can end up chasing down the market, destined to end up with a weekly rent price below market value, plus you’ll bear the rent cost you missed out on when your property was vacant.

Forecast looks positive for landlords

Pleasingly for landlords, the Perth rental market has improved over the last six months and we are slowly seeing it transition into a more balanced market.

The Perth vacancy rate declined to 5.3 per cent in January – the lowest level since July 2015 and down from a peak of 7.2 per cent in June 2017. This sharp decline indicates that normalcy is returning and market parity, in terms of supply and demand, is not far away.

Despite these obvious improvements, REIWA’s forecast for 2018 cautions against expectations of rapid growth in rent prices over the coming year. Property owners are still advised to meet the market – you are better off with less rent per week than having a long vacancy period with no rental income at all.

It is also advisable to be flexible with the conditions you put on your rental. For example, not allowing tenants who own a pet to rent your property can deter people who would otherwise be interested. It’s in your best interest to consider tenants with pets on a case-by-case basis, secure in the knowledge the bond, pet bond and landlord insurance will be there to cover any pet-related damage.

For obligation free landlord assistance Sarah Morgan 9475 9622

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06 April 2018
By portermathewsblog


Best Home Decorating Apps
Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Julia Sperling

Home decorating is a hefty investment. Whether you’re renovating or rearranging a room, shopping for a new piece of statement furniture, or designing a new home, there’s always plenty of what ifs to consider. Where to put the lounge? Will it even fit? Ivory or eggshell? It’s a process that can make the best of us question our decision-making abilities.

Of course, like any educated 21st-century citizen would do to make life easier, you turn to apps. And of course, like any 21st-century dilemma, there are plenty of technological solutions for it. Below, we’ve found the five best apps to help you in whatever decorating rut you may find yourself in.

For Inspiration and Ideas

For Inspiration and Ideas

Try: Houzz Interior Design Ideas, Free on iOS and Google Play

Browse through countless photos for inspiration, use the sketch feature to bring your dream room to life, or find a local home professional to help you out with all your decorating needs. The app’s also got a nifty product section to make sourcing products easy.

For Colour Selection

For Colour Selection

Try: Color911, $5.99 on iOS

Whether you want to create a colour scheme for a room, or can’t decide what shade of turquoise will match your throw pillows, Color911 makes colour selection easy. Choose and download from more than 100 colour themes, or build your own custom palette library from photos.
For Collecting Measurements

For Collecting Measurements

Try: Photo Measures, $10.99 on iOS and $4.99 on Google Play

Love the look of a couch but aren’t quite sure if it’ll fit in the space you have? Photo Measures takes the guesswork out of this and allows you to snap photos of every room and draw measures on it. Record and save everything from your living room space to bookshelf width.

For Room Planning

For Room Planning

Try: Mark on Call, $4.49 on iOS

Who said floor plans were intimidating? Mark on Call is like having a personal interior designer at your fingertips, allowing you to map out each room to precision. Enter your room and furniture dimensions and you can rearrange pieces until your heart’s content, even with your skin or finish of choice.
For Real-Time Visualisation

For Real-Time Visualisation

Try: IKEA Catalogue, Free on iOS and Google Play

The app’s 3D and augmented reality feature allows you to visualise what pieces of furniture will look like in your home, meaning hassle- and worry-free shopping. You can even pull pieces directly out of current catalogues, or choose from iconic IKEA pieces in the library.

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26 March 2018
By portermathewsblog


via popsugar.com.au

Money-Saving Tips For Decorating Your First ApartmentImage Source: Studio McGee

Sure, graduation and your first job are huge steps towards adulthood, but what’s the true sign that you’ve officially made it? When you get the keys to your very own apartment. Moving into your first (or second) place is a big deal, but we all know it can come at a high price. It was a rude awakening the day we realised our Pinterest-fuelled dreams didn’t exactly fit our budget. But don’t give up hope! Having an apartment that’s chic and affordable is totally possible. The key is knowing the tricks and hacks that will help you save money without skimping on style. That way, you’ll save your money for what’s really important . . . the housewarming party.

1. Upgrading your wall art? Don’t spend a fortune

Image Source: Domino

Building up an art collection doesn’t have to be crazy expensive. If you can’t bare white walls, there are plenty of websites that specialise in affordable art.

2. Add Something Old


Image Source: Melanie Acevedo for Domino

Add character and save cash by buying your decor secondhand, a trick from former Bachelorette star Jillian Harris. Local thrift stores and flea markets are all full of fun and practical finds that won’t cost a fortune.

3. DIY When You Can

Image Source: Dana Miller / House*Tweaking

If you’re up to the challenge, take on a DIY project — the beautiful results might surprise you. This bar cart is actually an inexpensive Ikea kitchen cart that was repurposed with green paint, wood stain, a bottle opener, and a towel bar.

4. Think Long-Term, Not Just For Now

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Adrian Busse

Since it is likely you’ll be moving around for the next few years, pick items that can travel with you. Avoid oversize furniture and be sure to invest in pieces you’ll love for years to come.

5. Master the Art of Paint

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Adrian Busse

Even the grungiest flea market piece has potential to be beautiful. A fresh coat of bright paint can make all the difference and will help your space look dressed up, even though you’re on a budget.

6. Do Double-Duty


Image Source: Matthew Williams via LABLstudio

Short on space and money? Make sure the few pieces you do invest in can serve more than one purpose. This coffee table doubles as extra seating when guests come to visit.

7. Make the Mattress Your Splurge

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Adrian Busse

Money is tight when you’re moving into a new place, but the one thing you should never skimp on with quality is your mattress. Not only will it get a lot of use, but going cheap can lead to back pain and health issues. Check out these tips for buying a quality mattress.

8. Raid the Garage

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Lisette Mejia

If you have relatives nearby, get busy exploring the garage or attic for handy items you can commandeer for yourself. Things like silverware, old furniture, or art could make their way into your stylish studio.

9. Get Creative With Storage

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Adrian Busse

Yes, your first apartment is probably pretty tiny, but use organisation to your advantage. While you can keep big items tucked away in a box under the bed or in your closet, keep jewellery, makeup, and other small collectables stored out in the open.

10. Buy Budget-Friendly Essentials

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Adrian Busse

No adult should have to live with paper plates and sheets for curtains, but if you’re worried about all the little things adding up, there are ways to get what you need while staying on budget. Shopping for affordable apartment essentials means that you can squeeze everything you need into your budget.

 

 

 

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23 March 2018
By portermathewsblog


via popsugar.com.au

It’s no wonder the co-founder of Done & Done NYC, a professional organising, de-cluttering, and staging business, is just as organised in her personal life as her professional life. Abby Löfberg has the scoop on how Kate Pawlowski’s daily routine stays on track.

Image Source: ShopStyle Photography

Our co-founder Kate Pawlowski is 28 years old and the most high-functioning person I know. (Read her bio here) What’s great about her is that she gives advice that someone like me (who doesn’t “run a home” and is not naturally organized) can actually follow and implement.

I grilled her about her entire day, and gleaned a couple of great habits that she does unconsciously and without thinking. She says that these are so easy, they don’t feel overwhelming — they become ingrained into your habits, and you end up looking forward to the feeling of relief you get after such little effort, like brushing your teeth in the morning.

1. Morning

When she wakes up, Kate fills her kettle and turns it on. During the three minutes it takes to boil for her morning tea, she unloads the dishwasher, so she never has to keep dishes in the sink and just pops them straight in the dishwasher all day. Imagine never having to have a terrifying sink full of dirty dishes! (I actually do this too. It works!)

2. Showering

She keeps a magic eraser in her shower and wipes down the walls right after she shuts the water off to keep it clean and mildew-free. This prevents slime and grime from building up in the grout, and she never has to do a deep shower clean other than during her seasonable deep cleaning sprees.

3. Getting dressed

She is all about stylish basics that work for multiple purposes — especially with her underwear. When Kate buys her undies, she makes sure they match a few of her existing bras, so she can quickly pull out a pair and be in a matching set. When she takes off her clothes at night, her bra and undies go right into the mesh delicates bag she has hanging on her closet door, so they’re ready to pop in the wash once a week. (She actually has a bunch of these bags in different sizes and washes most of her clothes this way to take care of them). This way, she never runs out of underwear and has to do a last-minute wash while wearing granny panties.

4. Evening

She spends seven to 10 minutes every night tidying her desk, her coffee table, folding throw blankets, and starting the dishwasher so she can wake up fresh in the morning and get right to coffee and work.

5. Shopping

Living in an organised way is not just about where you put your things — it starts with what you let into your house in the first place. Kate is vigilant about her shopping habits — she does research on clothes and reads reviews before she buys them. She knows what cuts work for her and which materials she is most comfortable wearing. She also takes care of her clothes really well by washing everything on a delicate cold-cold cycle. This way, her clothes stay in top condition and she doesn’t have to buy as much. This is part of a philosophy we at Done & Done NYC call Owning Well — in other words, how to own less things that work perfectly for you is a more efficient and less expensive way to have an organised space.

 

 

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19 March 2018
By portermathewsblog


via domain.com.au

Getting your foot into the door isn’t cheap, but sometimes it’s where the money is spent that comes as a shock to first-home buyers.

It’s not over once the deposit has been saved and the winning offer made. Experts have identified five areas where hidden costs might be lurking, and how a buyer can avoiding paying more than they need to.

1. Pre-purchase research

Anna Porter, a property valuer and principal at strategic property investment company Suburbanite, said budgeting for pre-purchase inspections is important.

“There’s a whole range of reports you can get – you can spend $5000 just on due diligence,” she said.

 What could look like a minor issue may cost more in the long run.
 What could look like a minor issue may cost more in the long run.Photo: Erin Jonasson

Not doing the research can prove costly. Mortgage Choice CEO John Flavell said it was vital to conduct proper pest and building inspections.

“It is a small amount to pay for peace of mind and it can help you to avoid buying a property with structural faults or insect infestations,” he explained.

CM Lawyers head conveyancer Alex Sapounas said that trying to avoid buying quality building reports was also a common error.

“Unfortunately there’s no fallback position with major structural flaws.”

Strata reports were also very important, he said, particularly regarding special levies and changes to the standard bylaws.

 

2. Conveyancing fees

Some first-home buyers are surprised to discover they need to engage a conveyancer, or are alarmed by the price.

Rules around conveyancing vary from state to state, but Mr Sapounas said first-home buyers should be talking to a conveyancer at the start of the buying process.

Mr Sapounas said some buyers didn't even have the contracts reviewed prior to bidding at auction.
Mr Sapounas said some buyers didn’t even have the contracts reviewed prior to bidding at auction.

He said it was common to see first-home buyers making mistakes that could cost far more in the long run than the $1500 to $2000 conveyancing fee.

Many did not understand the difference between pre-approval and actual approval, how much of a deposit they need, and when they could pull out of the purchase of a property.

“A lot of first-home buyers don’t even have the contract reviewed prior to auction,” he said.

3. Government and bank fees

Mr Flavell identifies stamp duty, the property transfer fee, and mortgage registration fee as government costs new buyers need to know about.

When it comes to home loans there’s the loan application fee, ongoing bank fees and the lender’s property valuation to consider.

A slowing market might impact whether on not a buyer opts for LMI, or a 20 per cent deposit.
A slowing market might impact whether on not a buyer opts for LMI, or a 20 per cent deposit. Photo: Dominic Lorrimer

Another potential expense is Lender’s Mortgage Insurance – LMI – which protects the lender from losing money if the borrower defaults on their loan, and the sale of the property doesn’t cover the money owed.

Generally, it’s a condition of borrowing with less than a 20 per cent deposit, and the cost can be included in the loan amount.

Analysis from financial comparison site Canstar shows that first-time buyers who opt for a 10 per cent deposit and LMI as opposed to taking longer to save a 20 per cent deposit could also wind up paying more overall.

It depends on the growth in property values, with 3.83 per cent annual growth being the break-even point for a $500,000 purchase. If growth is slower, buyers could be better off saving the 20 per cent deposit, but if the market moves faster, LMI is outweighed by capital gains.

Capture

4. Moving in, and moving tenants in

Ms Porter said first-time investors often don’t plan for professional cleaning fees.

“When a vendor moves out, there’s not a requirement for how clean the apartment has to be,” she said.

If the property is left in a passable condition, but not clean enough to meet the standards of a rental property, it might require a professional cleaner, and a $500-plus outlay.

Dixon Advisory’s head of advice Nerida Cole explained there could be quite a big “gap in expectation” for new buyers, in terms of what they’re prepared to live with compared to what a tenant expects.

“If you want to have a good tenant, you want to make sure property is presented well.”

When a vendor moves out, there's not a requirement for how clean they need to leave the property.New homeowners may be left to foot the cleaning bill when the vendor moves out. Photo: Steven Siewert

She added that the early period can be a pressure point for investors who expect to receive rent straight away.

“There can be a bit of a delay in the cash flow coming in from the rent. Up front there’s the property manager costs, the campaign to get a tenant – but you are paying interest from day one.”

Owner-occupiers also need to manage expectations and expenses. “It might take you two years to furnish the house properly, rather than racing in and trying to make it look like a Vogue magazine.”

5. Landscaping and repairs

Ms Porter recommends keeping aside $4000 for $5000 as a maintenance slush-fund.

“You can buy a property and suddenly the hot water dies, or the airconditioning dies and you have to replace it,” she said.

Ms Cole said the cost of upkeep for a backyard can come as a surprise for buyers upgrading from an apartment.

“Plant trimmers, lawnmowers, it does add up. When you’re a new home buyer, you don’t have much cash up your sleeve.”

There can be some surprises in moving from an apartment to a free-standing house with a backyard.

There can be some surprises in moving from an apartment to a free-standing house with a backyard.

Landscaping can also be costly, especially for new builds. Ram Venkatagiri, from Financial Quotient, says that the price of structures like retaining walls can come as a shock to some buyers.

“Sometimes they cannot be determined by the builder at outset, until they perform site works after the building contract has been entered into,” he said.

He noted that blinds, curtains and security grilles aren’t always included in the price of a house and land package, adding thousands to the overall cost.

 

 

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09 March 2018
By portermathewsblog


via popsugar.com.au


Image Sources: Laura Metzler and Homepolish

The way Shannon Smith transforms a bare apartment into a cosy home might cause you to confuse her for a magician, or an interior design fairy godmother at the very least. The Homepolish interior designer can do wonders to a space no matter how tight the budget or small the square footage.

The secret to creating a stunning home, she says, is to focus on three things when decorating. “I am a firm believer that you don’t need a lot of stuff to make your space feel finished. If you consider these three things — texture, colour, and scale — you can make any space feel cosy.”

Keep reading to hear what Shannon has to say about approaching each.

  1. Texture: The More The Merrier


    Image Sources: Laura Metzler and Homepolish

    “Add texture with area rugs, drapery, vintage pieces, or natural fibers,” Shannon advises.

  2. Colour: Layer Three


    Image Sources: Laura Metzler and Homepolish

    “Layer colour in your space to add depth, even if it’s neutral,” she says. “I always try to choose three colours — a light colour, a dark colour, and something in between — and scatter them throughout the space.”

  3. Scale: Go Big, or Go Home

Image Sources: Laura Metzler and Homepolish

“Large art pieces, leaning floor mirrors, and big area rugs accentuate the height of the ceilings or the width of a room,” explains Shannon. “If you are worried about living in a small space, focus particularly on this tip as it will usually make your space feel larger.”

 

 

 

 

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26 February 2018
By portermathewsblog


We are proud to announce that we won 2 awards as the “AGENCY OF THE YEAR” in the RateMyAgent 2018 Agent of the Year Awards.  The awards, which are the largest real estate awards in Australia, recognise those agents and agencies that have ranked the highest based on customer reviews and feedback.

448759-badges (1)
RAVEEN LIYANAGE WON THE THE AWARD FOR THE “AGENCY OF THE YEAR FOR MADDINGTON”

 

448764-badges (1)

HASI KODAGODA WON THE THE AWARD FOR THE “AGENCY OF THE YEAR FOR BECKENHAM”

Nick

NICK MITCHELL WON THE THE AWARD FOR THE “AGENCY OF THE YEAR FOR FORRESTFIELD”

The RateMyAgent Agent of the Year Awards compare over 32,000 agents and agencies across the country.  They highlight the leading real estate agents and agencies in each suburb, city and state across Australia, and on a national level.

“The RateMyAgent Agent of the Year Awards are the only awards which use verified customer reviews and feedback, so they’re an honest gauge of the customer service an agent has provided,” said RateMyAgent CEO & Co-Founder, Mark Armstrong.  “These awards are the only industry awards to put sellers’ needs first, using customer reviews as a leading indicator of an agent’s success over 2017.”
Our team was also,

  • David Quadros – No 1 agent by recommendation in Ascot
  • David Quadros – No 3 agent by recommendation in Belmont.
  • Greg O – No 1 agent by recommendation in Belmont.

Click below to find out

View our  RateMyAgent profile here.

https://www.ratemyagent.com.au/real-estate-agency/porter-matthews-metro-ak795/sales/reviews

 

 

 

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26 February 2018
By portermathewsblog


via popsugar.com.au

5 Design Trends That Need to Be on Your Radar If You're Renovating in 2018Image Source: GIA Bathroom & Kitchen Renovations

 

In 2018, interior style is all about rejecting conformity to a particular “look” and embracing imperfections. Individual touches have never been so big and anything with a touch of whimsy gets full marks. Basically, 2018 is bringing about the death of monochrome and minimalism and the rise of eclectic hygge-ness.

Here Houzz Australia zone in on what that all means exactly — with a community of 1.5 million design and reno professionals, they seemed the right people to ask.
1. Handcrafted Wall Treatments

Handcrafted Wall TreatmentsImage Source: Suzi Appel Photography

Whether tribal or handmade-looking, tiles that add a handcrafted touch to an otherwise sleek and modern kitchen are on the rise. It takes modern kitchens, which were on the verge of looking like spacecrafts, back to that "heart of the home" space. Bang on for the hygge trend.
Image Source: Space Craft Joinery / Jonathan VDK

Whether tribal or handmade-looking, tiles that add a handcrafted touch to an otherwise sleek and modern kitchen are on the rise. It takes modern kitchens, which were on the verge of looking like spacecrafts, back to that “heart of the home” space. Bang on for the hygge trend.

2. Cabinetry With Personality

Cabinetry With PersonalityImage Source: Woods & Warner

Houzz has seen a rise in cabinetry and handles that give a room character. Oversized and elongated wooden knobs work in kitchens or bedrooms.
Image Source: Kyal and Kara and Wideline Windows & Doors

Houzz has seen a rise in cabinetry and handles that give a room character. Oversized and elongated wooden knobs work in kitchens or bedrooms.

3. Anti Mass-Manufactured Furniture

Anti Mass-Manufactured FurnitureImage Source: Decus Interiors / Justin Alexander

Linen bean bags, curvy lines and puffy sofas culminate to make a non-uniform, more organic living space. This means mixing an eclectic selection of seating and tables in your living areas.
Linen bean bags, curvy lines and puffy sofas culminate to make a non-uniform, more organic living space. This means mixing an eclectic selection of seating and tables in your living areas.

4. Brass Is Still the Metal of Choice

Brass Is Still the Metal of Choice
Image Source: GIA Bathroom & Kitchen Renovations

Houzz are seeing no signs of the metallic trend abating. Copper and gold will still be coveted in 2018, but they predict brass will take the cake.
Image Source: GIA Bathroom & Kitchen Renovations

Houzz are seeing no signs of the metallic trend abating. Copper and gold will still be coveted in 2018, but they predict brass will take the cake.

5. Dual-Material Benchtops

Dual-Material BenchtopsImage Source: Art of Kitchens Pty Ltd.

Kitchen counters and islands that are a mix of marble, concrete or wood rose to popularity on this season of The Block, and that was just the beginning.

 

 

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22 February 2018
By portermathewsblog


via popsugar.com.au

9 Decorating Mistakes Even Design Lovers MakeImage Source: The Makerista

 

Switching up your decor can make a surprisingly huge difference in the way you feel at home, but beware of common decorating traps. Before you tackle these bold design updates, be mindful not to do these 9 things:

       1.Don’t Forget About Lighting

Don't Forget About LightingImage Source: A Beautiful Mess

Even the most beautiful of rooms can be thwarted by bad lighting. The most welcoming spaces are filled with soft layers of flattering lighting at various heights (a chandelier, floor lamp, desktop lamp, etc.), not just one harsh light source. If the space has little natural light, use mirrors to brighten it up by reflecting what natural light there is around the room.

    2. Don’t Hang Pictures at the Wrong Height

Don't Hang Pictures at the Wrong HeightImage Source: Honestly WTF

You’ve found the perfect picture, paired it with the perfect frame, and now it’s time to hang it at the perfect height. The centre of the image should be at eye height, around 144cm — lower than most people expect. If you’re putting up a gallery wall, you not only need to be thoughtful with the height of the image but also the layout. Take care to mock up where each picture will go before you start putting nails in the wall.

       3. Don’t Have Tons of Throw Pillows

Don't Have Tons of Throw PillowsImage Source: Sarah Hearts

They’re affordable, easy to swap out, and a great way to transform the look of a room; however, it’s easy to get carried away with them, picking up one or two every time you’re shopping until you have no space on your sofa left to actually sit. If throw pillows are deflated and flat, or more tired than trendy, it’s time to toss them. As a rule of thumb, only buy a new pillow if you’re willing to part with an old.

      4. Don’t Blindly Follow Trends

Don't Blindly Follow TrendsImage Source: The Makerista

Of course, you want your interior design to be up-to-date, and it’s great to keep an eye on the 2016 trends — but beware of incorporating every trend into your home. Rose quartz and serenity might be the colours of the year, but that doesn’t mean you need to repaint all your walls. Just as with fashion, certain trends work better for certain people, so adopt and adapt as best suits your home and needs. If the season’s dark and moody hues are too much for your space, paint a single accent wall and incorporate edgy leopard in an occasional chair that can easily be swapped out as tastes change.

 5. Don’t Go Overboard With Decorative Painting

Don't Go Overboard With Decorative Painting
Image Source: StyleMutt

With a bucket of paint, you can do many a wonderful thing to a wall. You can also do many a horrible thing. Stencils, brushes, and the like have their place, but be careful not to gild the lily. In other words, keep decorative paint elements simple. That mural or stenciled design should enhance the room, not dominate it. And leave the sponge painting in the ’80s. Period.

    6. Don’t Hang Onto Pieces That No Longer Serve You

Don't Hang Onto Pieces That No Longer Serve YouImage Source: A Beautiful Mess

It can be hard to get rid of belongings that have sentimental value or that you shelled out big bucks for, even if they’ve outgrown their purpose. If you don’t, however, they’ll begin to overwhelm your home until its more cluttered than cute. Be honest with yourself and sort out the pieces you can really use, and get rid of the rest.

7. Don’t Push Furniture Against the Walls

Don't Push Furniture Against the WallsImage Source: The Decor Fix

Pro designers cringe when they see living room furniture pushed flush against a wall. Not only does it create awkward, empty space in the middle of the room, but it creates a formal, unwelcoming vibe. Make better use of the the space and warm up the room’s vibe by arranging furniture within the room instead of against it. Trust us, no one will mind seeing the back of your sofa.

8. Don’t Ignore Practical Needs

Don't Ignore Practical NeedsImage Source: Inspired by Charm

Get realistic about your family’s needs and budget, and design accordingly. While you may be lusting after the glam mirrored Hollywood regency coffee table, your young children mean you must forgo it for a soft, upholstered ottoman. Blowing your room budget on a single item is equally as devastating to your design. A truly great space is one that functions well for you.

  9. Don’t Design Without a Plan

Don't Design Without a PlanImage Source: Sarah Hearts

Every space has its own distinct style and purpose, and it’s important to figure out what that is before you begin to decorate. Even eclectic-style rooms have a cohesive design theme that holds them together. Without any overarching purpose or theme, a room quickly becomes chaotic and adrift. You don’t need to know exactly where each piece of decor will go, but you should have a general idea of what you want.

 

 

 

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15 February 2018
By portermathewsblog


via popsugar.com.au

15 Easy Ways to Make an Old Home Look Like NewImage Source: Inspired by Charm

This past weekend, my husband and I moved from the 94-year-old home we’ve been renting in the Berkeley Hills to a 58-year-old home around the corner. I have always had a soft spot for old homes — the architecture, the charm, the doorknobs! — but they definitely come with their quirks. Love ’em or hate ’em — if you’re living in an old house, you know there are some issues to contend with. Read on to find a list of 15 (relatively) quick fixes to make your old home feel new again.

Paint the Cabinets

Paint the Cabinets
Image Source: A Beautiful Mess

This is a big project, I won’t lie. I painted my cabinets once despite being spectacularly DIY averse. But that monotonous oak was killing me, so I persevered. And it is so worth it! A few cans of paint (and many hours of your life) will completely transform your kitchen — in fact, your whole home.

Paint a Tile Backsplash

Paint a Tile Backsplash
Image Source: One Kings Lane

Boring white tile backsplash? No matter — geometric patterns are hot this year, and you can make your own in a weekend!

Give Your Pantry a Makeover

Give Your Pantry a MakeoverImage Source: Polished Habitat

What with layers of paint and warping wood, old house pantries can definitely be lacking, so give yours a makeover! Make it the happiest place in the house.

Paint a Brick Fireplace

Paint a Brick FireplaceImage Source: Inspired by Charm

If your brick surround is an eyesore, not to worry — just paint it.

Cover a Popcorn Ceiling With Wood Planks

Cover a Popcorn Ceiling With Wood PlanksImage Source: Domino

Is this a major project? Yes. But then everything related to the ubiquitous popcorn ceiling seems to be. This is a doable DIY if you plan ahead. And the outcome is gorgeous!

Replace Ugly Doorknobs With Vintage Versions

Replace Ugly Doorknobs With Vintage Versions
Image Source: House Tweaking

This is an easy fix, but buying reproduction doorknobs can get pricey fast. To keep the budget down, shop local salvage yards or source an eclectic collection on Etsy.

Paint Kitchen and Bath Hardware

Paint Kitchen and Bath HardwareImage Source: Brittany Makes

Old kitchen and bath hardware can look pretty tired, and it’s no wonder, what with all the heavy lifting they do for us every day. But with a little sanding, primer, and paint, you can give them a new life. Check out this tutorial on how to spray-paint hardware for some inspiration!

Paint the Floor

Paint the Floor
Image Source: Little Green Notebook

Check out this great tutorial on how to paint a tile floor. Let your creativity run free with multiple colours and a repeating pattern.

Paint a Wood Fireplace

Paint a Wood FireplaceImage Source: The Makerista

Does your old house have a room (or rooms) full of wood siding? Can there be too much of a good thing? Sometimes a focal point is all that’s needed to draw the eye.

Dress Up a Cinder Block Wall With Chalk Paint

Dress Up a Cinder Block Wall With Chalk PaintImage Source: Sarah Hearts

Are you cursed with a dated cinder block patio wall? Do this now! Cutest solution ever, although definitely opt for paint over chalk to make sure your hard work lasts and lasts.

Paint Your Trim

Paint Your TrimImage Source: The Makerista

Old homes often have intricate architectural details — show them off by painting them a dramatic contrasting colour.

Container Garden in Place of Landscaping

Container Garden in Place of LandscapingImage Source: A Beautiful Mess

If your landscaping looks as old as your house but new landscaping is not in the budget, try a container garden instead. Add a few at a time (just remember to water them from time to time), and soon your garden will be looking cheerful.

Spray-Paint ’80s Brass Light Fixtures

Spray-Paint '80s Brass Light FixturesImage Source: Brittany Ambridge for Domino

Sometimes a can of spray paint and an afternoon is all it takes to update an old light fixture.

Tile Over Your Countertop

Tile Over Your CountertopImage Source: A Beautiful Mess

Dated tile? Yucky grout? Tile over it! Click here for the DIY.

Paint Your Stone Patio Tiles With Pops of Colour

Paint Your Stone Patio Tiles With Pops of ColourImage Source: A Beautiful Mess

Leave it to the bloggers at A Beautiful Mess to make even an ugly concrete patio look adorable.

 

 

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13 February 2018
By portermathewsblog


via www.domain.com.au

More Perth properties may soon be sold under the hammer.More Perth properties may soon be sold under the hammer. Photo: Peard Real Estate

With the Perth property market in a state of recovery, agents are predicting auctions will rise in popularity in favour of the traditional offer and acceptance sales method.

While latest Domain Group auction data revealed there were 180 auction listings in Perth in November, with a clearance rate of 30 per cent — in comparison to Sydney data for the same month of 4,187 listings with a clearance rate of 55 per cent — there were signs more homes will be sold under the hammer in Perth in 2018.

Domain Group data scientist Nicola Powell said a seasonality effect was obvious when looking at auction data for Perth, where there tended to be more homes for auction in the spring months.

Auctioneers expect to be busier in Perth this year.Auctioneers expect to be busier in Perth this year. Photo: Dan Soderstorm

She said auctions were ingrained in the Sydney and Melbourne vendor market, and as the Perth property market began to recover, auction conditions might improve.

JLL buyers advocate Lachlan Delahunty said “auction” seemed to be a foreign word in WA.

“However, we should start to get comfortable with the process, as it will soon hit our shores,” he said.

“Properties sold under the hammer signify only three per cent of Perth property. Unfathomable when comparing that to the likes of Melbourne and Sydney with clearance rates of 80 to 90 per cent.

“Hot markets attract auctions – like bees to honey, as we have seen in Sydney in the early stages of last year.

“However, this form of selling is certainly no place for a soft market, which Perth has experienced in recent years, recording clearance rates as low as 30 per cent in the final parts of 2017.”

Mr Delahunty predicted if the WA market continued to improve during the first few months of this year, properties in coastal and blue chip suburbs would start to see the benefits of a bidding frenzy.

LJ Hooker national auction manager David Holmes said auction volumes in Perth remained steady and almost unchanged: 1973 in Perth last year, compared to 1964 in 2016.

“Perth is still a long way off the auction volumes of the eastern states – Melbourne recorded more than 50,671 auctions last year (a 19 per cent increase year on year) with Sydney notching 40,281 (a 16 per cent increase),” he said.

“However, at the end of 2017 and already in 2018, our offices have fielded more inquiries from sellers about the opportunities to auction their properties. LJ Hooker Kalamunda Foothills auctioned four times as many properties in 2017 than they did the previous year and expect to hold even more in 2018.

“Data has indicated a shift in the Perth market, with the first positive price recorded in the last quarter for a long time. When markets begin to recover, that’s when auctions rise in popularity as buyers openly compete to determine what new market value is.”

Rob Druitt, First National Real Estate Druitt and Shead principal and auctioneer, said auctions were on the rise in Perth, with buyers becoming more savvy in their understanding of the process.

“It’s unlikely in the short to medium term that we will catch up to the like of Melbourne or Sydney, however, as our market improves we are likely to see more auctions,” he said.

Mr Druitt said there were many benefits to selling and buying at auction.

“For the sellers, it is a quicker sale process and if the property is worth more than we all think, they will achieve it,” he said.

“For the buyers, in what is becoming a more competitive market place for certain types of properties, if they are organised, they have a genuine opportunity to buy the property in an open fair forum as opposed to properties selling off the market or quickly with multiple offers.

“For the market, it is good as it helps to genuinely set the market value of property and provides immediate feedback to the market on sales evidence and interest.

“Also, if the property doesn’t sell on the day of auction it will come on the market post-auction and is available to conditional buyers.”

Acton auctioneer Boyd Fraser said the benefits of auctions included a compressed campaign for 21 days and a 50 per cent chance of selling under the hammer on the day.

“Both buyers and sellers are in the same forum so transparency in the process is guaranteed. There is a significant difference in the number of days on market,” he said.

Western suburbs were popular areas for auctions, but other standout areas included Spearwood, Hamilton Hill and Coogee, Mr Fraser said.

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08 February 2018
By portermathewsblog


via popsugar.com.au

The Perfect Plant For Every Room in Your HomeImage Source: Armelle Habib

When it comes to the upsides of green thumbs, many of us are well-versed. Plants can be air-purifying, calming, insect-repellingsleep-inducing, or lighten up a space. Bringing parts of the outdoors in though, can often present challenges — where are the plants going to go? Will they suit the room? What if I’m already short on space? What about the temperature?

To save you spiralling into an endless Google search for answers, we’re breaking down the best indoor plants for every room, right here. With some handy styling tips, too, so now, there’s really no excuse not to go green.

This is an edited extract from Plant Society by Jason Chongue, published by Hardie Grant Books ($29.99) and available in stores nationally.

Living Room

Living RoomImage Source: Armelle Habib

The living room is the perfect place to go wild and use multiple plant types when styling. Use plants both individually and in groupings to get different effects. Tall, tree-like plants, like the rubber plant and dinner-plate ficus, are great specimen plants if you want to add drama into your room. You can also mix plain-leafed plants with more textured types.

Some good living room plants include:


Bedroom

BedroomImage Source: Armelle Habib

We spend a large portion of our lives in our bedroom, but it is often the last place we consider when introducing plants into our homes. Your bedside table is perfect for a compact plant that will help aerate the air while you sleep. Textural plants like devil’s ivy, philodendron and monstera make a nice addition to your bedroom and are a great thing to look at when you first wake up.

Some good bedroom plants include:

  • Arrowhead plant (Syngonium)
  • Begonia
  • Devil’s ivy (Epipremnum aureum)
  • Fruit salad plant (Monstera deliciosa)
  • Peace lily (Spathiphyllum)
  • Rubber plant (Ficus elastica)
  • Wax plant (Hoya)


Dining Room

Dining RoomImage Source: Armelle Habib

There is nothing more special than having guests sit around your dinner table when it’s adorned with some delicate plants. The best plants for your dining room are plants that will remain small and compact. There are several well suited species with a range of colours and forms.

Some good dining room plants include:

Bathroom

Image Source: Armelle Habib

The bathroom is the perfect location for growing plants that love humidity. If you’re short on space, try hanging devil’s ivy or pitcher plants from shelves or the ceiling. Plants like peace lilies, queen of hearts and arrowhead plant are great for creating small groupings of plants placed next to your shower or beside your vanity.

Some good bathroom plants include:

  • Arrowhead plant (Syngonium)
  • Devil’s ivy (Epipremnumaureum)
  • Peace lily (Spathihyllum)
  • Pitcher plant (Nepenthes)
  • Queen of hearts (Homalomena)
  • Tassel fern (Huperzia)
  • Zebra plant (Aphelandra)

Office / Desk

Office / DeskImage Source: Armelle Habib

Compact plants are perfect for decorating your desk at home or at the office. There is often limited natural light at work and air circulation is poor. Try using some hardier table plants such as the Zanzibar gem, cast-iron plant or peace lily.

Some good office plants include:

  • Cast-iron plant (Aspidistra elatior)
  • Fruit salad plant (Monstera deliciosa)
  • Peace lily (Spathihyllum)
  • Zanzibar gem (Zamioculcas).

Meeting, Hallway and Reception Areas

Meeting, Hallway and Reception AreasImage Source: Armelle Habib

Plants make for a nice welcome when placed in hallways in your home and in reception spaces. They are comforting and create a calming first impression. These spaces are often used heavily and have limited natural lighting so try using plants like the cast-iron plant, rubber plant or umbrella tree.

Some good hallway or meeting room plants include:

  • Bird of paradise (Strelitzia nicolai)
  • Cast-iron plant (Aspidistra elatior)
  • Dumb cane (Dieffenbachia)
  • Lady palm (Rhapis)
  • Rubber plant (Ficus elastica)

 

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08 February 2018
By portermathewsblog


via hartpartners.com.au

Parliament has passed the legislation allowing first home buyers to save for a deposit inside superannuation through the First Home Super Saver Scheme (FHSSS) and also allowing older Australians to ‘downsize’ and then contribute the proceeds of the sale of their family home into superannuation.

From 1 July 2018, a first home buyer will be able to withdraw voluntary superannuation contributions they have made since 1 July 2017(up to $30,000 each, with individuals being able to contribute up to $15,000 a year within existing caps), along with a deemed rate of earnings, to help buy their home.

Also, from 1 July 2018, when Australians aged 65 and oversell a home they have owned for at least 10 years, they may contribute up to $300,000 from the proceeds into their superannuation accounts, over and above existing contribution restrictions. Both members of a couple may take advantage of this measure, together contributing up to $600,000 from the proceeds of the sale into superannuation.

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30 January 2018
By portermathewsblog


Author: REIWA President Hayden Groves via reiwa.com.au

After a solid couple of years of subdued conditions in the Perth property market, we can look back on 2017 as a transitional period that brought about the bottom of the market.

Coming off the back of a very soft 2016, the Perth property market regained its foothold in 2017, with stable listings, sales and median house price levels observed.

The stability we are now witnessing across key market indicators is a welcome change.

What to expect in 2018

The forecast for 2018 is that the Perth market will moderately and steadily improve, however REIWA cautions against expectations of rapid growth in either the established housing or rental markets over the coming year.

In 2017 there was an average of 489 property sales recorded each week, which REIWA forecasts will lift to approximately 500 sales per week over the next six months. If sales volumes continue to trend at current levels, listing volumes will begin to fall, creating upward pressure on prices as demand builds.

We saw listings for sale start to level out and decrease last year, peaking at just over 15,000 in early 2017, before reaching a low of just over 13,000 in September.

With new dwelling activity set to decline in 2018, REIWA forecasts the number of properties for sale in Perth to remain at current levels over the next year, a level commensurate with market parity.

Perth rental market

Perth’s rental market also appeared to turn a corner in 2017, with listings declining from 11,000 in January to just over 9,300 by December.

Over this same time, leasing activity levels were strong, with approximately 1,180 rentals leased each week. If this trend persists, the balance between supply and demand of stock will continue to improve in 2018.

In a welcome change for investors, Perth’s median rent price has stabilised at $350 per week since April last year. While we don’t anticipate there will be significant growth to median rent prices in 2018, they’re not likely to fall either with quality family homes in particular in strong demand.

The Perth market is no longer experiencing significant declines in median house and rent prices, nor are we seeing listings for sale and for rent increasing at the rate they once were.

As market conditions improve and confidence returns, competition among buyers will inevitably increase.

If you’re thinking about purchasing your first home, trading-up or investing in property, my advice is to act sooner rather than later and take advantage of the stable and favourable market conditions.

To discuss your valuable investment with our Business Development Manager Sarah Morgan, give us a call on 9475 9622

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30 January 2018
By portermathewsblog


This Is What an Organised Linen Closet Should Look Like

Image Source: Target

The linen closet: if you are lucky enough to have one, you’ve likely asked yourself the question, “So what goes in here, anyway?”

In most homes, it’s the junk drawer of closets, but if stocked correctly, your hall closet can be a sanctuary and a one-stop shop all in one. At least, that’s what the founders of The Home Edit are determined to show us with their latest project. Professional organisers Clea Shearer and Joanna Teplin are teaming up with Target to reveal simple, stylish ways to make over the typical linen closet using affordable finds from the retailer.

So, what should every linen closet have? And what needs to get tossed for good? Read on for their expert recommendations.
What should every linen closet have?

What should every linen closet have?

Image Source: Target

Although most of your storage potential depends on the size of your space, a bare-bones closet should have the following, according to Clea and Joanna:

  1. Extra sets of sheets
  2. Extra towels
  3. Toiletry items, especially toilet paper rolls
  4. Bins and labels to easily sort and identify each category

Everything else — from extra pillows, blankets, and spare toothbrushes to hair straighteners and phone chargers for guests — are optional.

And as for those must-have bins?

It’s all about picking items that are practical and fit the dimensions of your space. “If your shelves have extra height, you want to choose something stackable,” they said. “If your shelves or drawers are extra deep, pick a bin with depth. Once you determine what makes the most sense, then make a selection that matches your aesthetic. Some people prefer natural materials to clear plastic, or opaque to transparent.” Bottom line? “The style of the bin should always come second to the function.”

What should every linen closet not have?

What should every linen closet <i>not</i> have?
Image Source: Target

There’s such a thing as too many bath towels, the two pros told POPSUGAR. “People often avoid editing items out before organizing the contents,” they revealed. “Purging duplicates, damaged items, or items you no longer use will ensure you have room for your necessities without overstocking.”

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25 January 2018
By portermathewsblog


via houzz.com.au

Welcome to our new series, ‘3 Things I Wish My Clients Knew’, where we’ll be asking a range of experts in the design world to reveal three things they wish every client understood, whether it’s answers to questions they’re commonly asked, practical considerations that would speed up the design and installation process, or knowledge gaps they’d love us to fill… plus a useful golden nugget for you to store away in your memory bank.

We kick off with interior designer Stephanie O’Donohue from smarterBATHROOMS+, who talks us through the things she wishes every client knew before starting a new bathroom.

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1. Minimalism is (almost) never cheap

‘Clean, sleek lines’ is what my clients ask for – think single sheets of material, no joins, no handles and no grout lines. The most common misconception I come across is that this is a cheap look to achieve. People are fooled by the apparent simplicity of the aesthetic. But to achieve a truly beautiful, minimalist look the detail in the build needs to be precise.

Some of the simplest-looking spaces I have worked on have been the most expensive, due to the immense detail and meticulous planning required.

 

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Specifying no cabinetry handles often means expensive opening mechanisms or hand-cut joinery. No joins in stone means buying oversized slabs and having an expert stonemason on hand to book-match the ends perfectly. And no grout lines means either huge, expensive tiles that take two tilers to lay (which doubles the labour cost) or porcelain sheets that can only be cut and installed by a stonemason – onto a wall that most likely has to be straightened instead of just packed.

 

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2. Don’t DIY your tiling – ever

It’s just not worth it. Planning the tiling and tiling itself are both art forms. I have seen far too many new bathrooms that only look good when you’re not wearing your glasses. Once you see a crooked tile or uneven grouting it cannot be unseen.

A tiler who plans the space, tile by tile, to ensure the placement of cuts and grout lines will be perfect is worth their weight in gold. You may be tempted to tackle a job that seems straightforward, but don’t do it. Especially if you have contrasting grout.

 

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A good tiler will work more quickly than you could ever hope to, and they will be able to correctly use epoxy grout, giving you a superior and longer-lasting finish than you’d achieve yourself with a regular cement-based grout. They will also be able to disguise an uneven wall or an unsightly edge to a degree.

The tiles and grout are your first defence against water damage. Inferior tiling puts your whole room and subfloor at risk. Step away from the tiles and call an expert. 


53. Tight budget? Stuck for a design idea? Go big!

This is one of my favourite tricks. Sometimes you can’t afford the Rolls Royce of every element in your space. But if you can distract from your more economical, practical design decisions with a wow feature, you can save yourself thousands in upgrading everything unnecessarily.

Oversized handles, for example, can add a touch of drama and interest to an otherwise plain bathroom. Have you got a high bathroom ceiling? Find the biggest pendant light your electrician can lift and fill the bathroom with an object so demanding of attention that it develops a personality of its own. You’ll find it gives your bathroom a real designer edge and detracts from the cheaper elements in the space.

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You could also distract the eye with repetition, where you take one design idea and use it several times over in a space. Do you love penny round tiles? Pick a round basin, rounded tapware, a round mirror and towels with a circular pattern. Repetition of a theme will give the space a cohesive, thought-out feel where every design decision is deliberate.

It will also help you shop better as you won’t fall into the trap of picking 10 things you love and finding none of them work together.

 

7 The one thing I always get asked is…
‘How long does a bathroom renovation take?’ Many people are surprised when they hear that a quality bathroom renovation takes about four weeks. Renovation shows are not reality!

Many people don’t have a spare bathroom they can use while the renovation takes place. If that’s the case for you, plan ahead. Hire a portable toilet or shower from a reputable builder, join a nearby gym (there are often free trials you can take advantage of), or consider renting elsewhere for a month while the job is done.None of these are ideal, but if you’re going to build a bathroom to last 20-30 years, that month of inconvenience will quickly be forgotten when you step inside your gorgeous new space.

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My golden nugget…

Unless it’s a colour other than chrome, a tap is a tap. Something basic will be fine, so don’t spend your hard-earned cash there. Funnel your money into custom cabinetry instead. Having a smart drawer that fits your lipstick collection perfectly, in a colour you love and with a concealed bin, will be worth so much more than the bragging rights for Italian taps.

 

 

 

 

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16 January 2018
By portermathewsblog


via popsugar.com.au

7 Ways to Stop Hating Your Small KitchenImage Source: A Beautiful Mess

 

So what if size isn’t on your kitchen’s side? You know the old “fake it ’til you make it” saying? Well, it applies to kitchen design, too! So, if your cook space’s dimensions have got you down, try these easy, foolproof tricks to make your kitchen feel and look bigger than it actually is.


1. 
Install a Vertical Backsplash

Install a Vertical BacksplashImage Source: Annie Schlechter for Domino

Want to visually increase your room’s dimensions? Simply turn subway tile on its head. Laying out the tiles vertically (rather than horizontally) draws the eye upward, making a kitchen ceiling appear taller than it actually is.

2. Open the Room Up With Open Shelving

Open the Room Up With Open ShelvingImage Source: Jeremy Liebman for Domino

Too many upper cabinets can make a tiny kitchen look top-heavy. Try removing a few and replace them with open shelving instead. Not only will your kitchen instantly open up, but you can show off prized cookware and accessories, too.

3. Lengthen With a Runner

Lengthen With a Runner
Image Source: House*Tweaking

For a quick and inexpensive way to make a kitchen look longer, simply add a graphic runner. Occasionally changing out the runner will give your kitchen a new look with little effort.

4. Save Space With Stools

Save Space With StoolsImage Source: domino

No room for a spacious kitchen table and chairs? Choose a narrow dining table with stools or benches that can tuck under the table. This set-up allows for better traffic flow while avoiding over-crowding your kitchen.

5. Get Your Shine On

Get Your Shine OnImage Source: domino

Even if you are shine-inclined, subtly reflective materials can help a kitchen feels larger by bouncing around natural light. Our faves: lacquered cabinets and reflective backsplash tiles.

 

6. Work With What You Have

Work With What You HaveImage Source: domino

Studio living can be tricky, especially since your living and sleeping quarters are limited to one room. This kitchen makes the most of the space with open shelving, a gallery wall, and even a TV! With clever arranging, you can cook and have your cable too!

 

7. Think Up

Think UpImage Source: hoto by Ditte Isager. Courtesy of Martha Stewart Living. Copyright © 2010.

Short on space? Think up! Pot racks are a great way to free up limited cabinet and counter space. If you’re on a budget, consider this affordable option.

 

 

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16 January 2018
By portermathewsblog


via therealestateconversation.com.au

As an auctioneer, clearly, I’d prefer that every auction made it to the big day. Sometimes, however, vendors opt to sell beforehand because of their unique financial or personal circumstances.

Can you really buy beforehand? 

There has always been some skepticism amongst buyers whether properties are really for sale prior to auction or whether it’s just a price fishing expedition.

In my experience, vendors who are open to selling before auction, generally are committed to the idea if an appropriate offer is made on their property. I generally find there are two types of buyers who make offers before auction.

The first is the buyer who is dipping their toe in the water, so to speak, and hoping to learn the seller’s price expectation. The other type of buyer is one who genuinely doesn’t want to bid at auction perhaps because they’ve missed out on a few properties already and want to learn sooner rather than later whether they’re in with a shot.

Selling before auction happens more often in specific market conditions, of course, but also at particular times of the year like before Christmas.

Some sellers just don’t want to have their properties still on the market over the holidays and for them certainty is more important than going to auction.

So, for those sellers, they are chasing peace of mind more than the best price. Selling before auction can happen in rising and falling markets in my experience. When a market starts to shift to the positive, more buyers tend to make solid offers before auction because they don’t want to run the risk of missing out on the day.

In southeast Queensland at present there are more sales before auction than usual for this time of year, because the market appears to be strengthening. In fact, I don’t think it’s increased this sharply for a number of years. If we use history as a teacher, it may be indicating that the southeast Queensland market is shifting into another gear as we head into 2018. Conversely, when a market starts to cool off, sellers think that they don’t have the same security blanket so they opt to accept offers beforehand.

What are the pros and cons?

Buyers must understand that buying before auction is an opportunity so you really must make your biggest and best offer if you’re serious about securing the property. You can’t try and buy prior by putting your toe in pool – you can only buy prior to auction by diving into the pool.

Don’t make an offer with the expectation that the seller or the agent is going to come back and tell you exactly what their lowest selling price is going to be, because that just doesn’t happen.

They’ll either say you’re close or you’re not even in the same ball park. Also, if a seller is prepared to accept offers prior, it’s unlikely that you will be the only buyer in the running so you must put your best foot forward.

Likewise, if you’re buying a property prior, you almost have to compensate the seller for the risk of them not taking the property to market on auction day. That means that quite often you have to pay a premium because you’re compensating the seller for not going through the campaign that they’ve been advertising for three or four weeks.

For vendors, selling before auction has to involve what I call a #noregretsprice. So it’s the figure that they’re not going to look in the rear view mirror and regret that they didn’t go to auction.

Going to auction could produce a spectacular result on the day if there are a number of competing bidders, backed up by a thorough marketing campaign. The reality is that sellers won’t know what the result will be until auction day – and for some peace of mind is more important, which is fine.

At the end of the day, buying or selling before auction can be a sound strategy as long as the vendor is prepared to accept that a higher price may have been achieved on the day and the buyer understands that they’re unlikely to get a bargain.

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